Integrated Crop Management

Advice to growers of Agrisure™ Rootworm Trait (MIR 604) hybrids and their neighbors

Syngenta's decision to proceed with encouraging farmers to plant Agrisure™ Rootworm Trait (MIR 604) hybrids has created concern among many people in the Midwest as well as around the world.

Certainly hybrids resistant to rootworm feeding are an advantage especially as corn following corn acreage increases. However, the fact that at this time the new Syngenta events are not approved in many countries outside of the United States presents marketing and production problems. These concerns apply equally to customers who buy corn directly and to customers who buy protein feed products from either corn wet milling or dry grind ethanol plants.

What should corn producers be aware of and what can they do?

The situation

The MIR 604 trait has been approved for domestic markets, but it is not approved in most export markets. Farmers who sign the Grain Use/Marketing Commitment and Agrisure™ Stewardship Agreement assume the responsibility to deliver the grain to an appropriate market that will then direct it to users who will not enter it or its products in export trade.

Precautions

At 35 meters, the lines intersect and the amount of outcrossing is less than 0.5 percent from that point onward. The level of outcrossing was even greater (refer to "Seed 2003" line) when local pollen production was artificially reduced to mimic levels typical of a hybrid seed production field.

Relationship between measured outcrossing and distance from pollen source (1 meter = 3.25 feet). [1]Relationship between measured outcrossing and distance from pollen source (1 meter = 3.25 feet). Measured outcrossing decreased exponentially with increasing distance from the pollen source. Source: Juan Astini, 2007, Ph.D. dissertation, Iowa State University

Resources

Roger Elmore is professor of agronomy with research and extension responsibilities in corn production. Mark Westgate has research and teaching responsibilities in corn and soybean physiology. Lori Abendroth is an agronomy specialist with research and extension responsibilities in corn production. Charles R. Hurburgh, Jr. is professor-in-charge of the Iowa Grain Quality Initiative Management Team and professor in the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering at Iowa State University.

This article originally appeared on pages 127-128 of the IC-498 (8) -- April 30, 2007 issue.


Source URL:
http://www.ipm.iastate.edu/ipm/icm//ipm/icm/2007/4-30/mir604.html