News

8 facts about charcoal rot in soybean

July 17, 2017

1) Develops in hot, dry weather conditions. Charcoal rot is a fungal disease that is most severe in years and areas experiencing hot, dry weather. However, this disease can also cause losses when ample moisture is present, making it a hidden threat to yield.

Bundle Deals at the ISU Extension Store!

February 28, 2017

The new crop season is right around the corner, and we want you to be prepared!

Two publications have new bundle discounts—the Weed Identification Field Guide, 2nd Edition, and the new Corn and Soybean Field Guide, recently published in fall 2016.corn and soybean field guide

Deals

Iowa Pest Resistance Management Plan Unveiled

January 30, 2017

Iowa Pest Resistance Management Plan logo

DES MOINES – Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey, Iowa State University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Associate Dean John Lawrence and Iowa farmer Larry Buss of Logan today announced the release of the Iowa Pest Resistance Management Plan. A video of the announcement is available here.

Version 1 of the IPRMP is an Iowa-specific plan that seeks to engage farmers on the issue of pest resistance management with the goal of keeping technology and tools such as pesticides, seed treatments and biotechnology products and native traits available and effective.

Emerald ash borer confirmed in Montgomery Co, IA

August 18, 2015

DES MOINES – The emerald ash borer (EAB), a destructive and invasive insect of ash trees has been discovered in central rural Montgomery County. Iowa’s growing number of counties with confirmed detections has now reached twenty-seven. Native to Asia, EAB has spread to 25 states since first being identified in Michigan back in 2002. This exotic pest is responsible for the death of tens of millions of ash trees.  Click for current map of infestations.

 

Emerald ash borer confirmed in Clinton County, IA

March 25, 2015

DES MOINES – Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been positively identified in the city of Clinton, making this the twentieth county in Iowa where this wood boring pest of ash trees has been found. EAB kills all ash tree species and is considered to be one of the most destructive tree pests ever seen in North America.

Emerald ash borer confirmed in Keokuk County

January 30, 2015

Iowa map of emerald ash borer confirmations

DES MOINES – Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been positively identified in the Iowa community of Hedrick in Keokuk County. EAB kills all ash tree species and is considered to be one of the most destructive tree pests ever seen in North America.

Be on the Lookout for Brown Stem Rot in Soybean

August 12, 2014

Soybean diseases are starting to show up in Iowa fields this growing season. In an On-Farm Network trial in north central Iowa, brown stem rot (BSR) was recently found. This disease is caused by the fungus Phialophora gregata, and infection can result in yield loss for Iowa farmers.

Turfgrass Rust

August 8, 2014

Rust is a fungal disease caused by several species of Puccinia.  All turfgrass species are susceptible to rust.  However, it is most commonly seen on perennial ryegrass and Kentucky bluegrass. 
 
From a distance, rust infected turf has a yellow-brown color.  Close examination of rust-infected grass blades reveals numerous yellow-orange pustules.  Rust can be easily diagnosed by walking across the lawn.  As one walks across the lawn, bright orange spores of the rust fungus rub off onto one’s shoes. 

Treatment for Prevention of Emerald Ash Borer

August 8, 2014

A recent inquiry from an Extension and Outreach colleague about timing of preventive treatments for the emerald ash borer (EAB) was insightful. This note is written to help direct types of treatments to the seasons they are most appropriate.
 
Insecticide product labels state that there are two windows for preventive treatments when applied to the soil or externally to the trunk of the tree: Spring and Fall.  Iowa State University Extension and Outreach publication PM2084 currently includes both windows, in keeping with the product labels.  Trunk injections can be done in a wider window (May through September 1) when the tree has a full crown and there is good soil moisture.

Yard and Garden: Tackling Common Summer and Fall Tree Issues

August 7, 2014

Trees can become afflicted with problems that can change their appearance and overall health. Iowa State University Extension and Outreach horticulturists offer tips on fighting these issues. To have additional questions answered, contact the ISU Hortline at 515-294-3108 or hortline@iastate.edu.

My magnolia is infested with magnolia scale.  What are my control options?

Magnolia scale (Neolecanium cornuparvum) is the largest scale insect in Iowa. Adult magnolia scale females are pinkish orange to brown, elliptical and up to one-half inch in diameter. Females give birth to their young (known as nymphs or crawlers) in late summer.

It’s Palmer Time

August 7, 2014

The lack of reliable traits to distinguish Palmer amaranth and waterhemp during vegetative stages complicates efforts at stopping the spread of Palmer amaranth across the state. However, both plants should be in full reproductive mode at this time, greatly simplifying the identification of the two amaranths.

While most agronomists and weed scientists prefer to identify weeds using vegetative traits, the small bracts (modified leaves) associated with flowers of Palmer amaranth and waterhemp are the most, if not only, reliable way to differentiate the two species. Palmer amaranth has relatively large, green bracts that extend well beyond the other flower parts, whereas on waterhemp the bracts are similar in length to the tepals surrounding the seed capsule. On close examination, Palmer amaranth’s bracts on mature female plants are easily seen protruding from the plant’s seedheads without the use of a hand lens. Redroot and smooth pigweed also have large bracts; however, these species have hairy stems in contrast to the smooth stems of Palmer amaranth and waterhemp.

Emerald Ash Borer Confirmed In Boone County

August 4, 2014

DES MOINES – Two adult Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) beetles have been collected from a trap in a residential tree in Boone and have been positively identified as EAB by a federal identifier. The trap was placed in the tree this summer after suspect galleries were found in an ash tree branch that fell during a storm.

A statewide quarantine restricting the movement of hardwood firewood, ash logs, wood chips and ash tree nursery stock out of Iowa into non-quarantined areas of other states was issued on Feb. 4, 2014 and remains in place.

 

Soybean Aphid Numbers on the Rise

August 4, 2014

Since 2000, soybean aphid has been the primary soybean insect pest in Iowa. Infestations are sporadic and unpredictable, but this insect has the ability to cause significant yield loss during periods of optimal reproduction. Several notable infestations have been reported, particularly in north-central Iowa, this week, and therefore scouting to determine population densities is strongly encouraged. Fields that have a fairly uniform infestation with low densities (e.g., 50% of plants infested with an average of 40 aphids per plant) should be closely monitored in August.

Control of Foliar Diseases on Tomatoes

July 25, 2014

Septoria leaf spot and early blight are common foliar diseases of tomatoes in home gardens.  Fungal diseases overwinter on plant debris in the soil.  Fungal spores are splashed onto plant foliage by raindrops or splashing water and invade the plant tissue when leaf surfaces are wet.  Rainy weather in spring and early summer favors development of foliar diseases on tomatoes. 

 

Periodical Cicadas: And Then They Were Gone

July 23, 2014

Sigh.  It's hard to believe but the periodical cicada emergence of 2014 that we waited 17 long years to see is over.  They came, they sang their song, they perpetuated the species (which is all that was expected on them, after all), and now they are gone.  Oh, there will be a few stragglers next summer to remind us of what was, but for the most part, those of us living in central Iowa will not see them here again until 2031.  Let the countdown begin!!

Grasshoppers in the Home Garden

July 23, 2014

Grasshoppers are an occasional pest in Iowa farms and gardens.  The number of grasshoppers varies greatly from year to year and from place to place.  This appears to be one of the years when at least some growers and gardeners are going to see more than the usual number.

Pages

Subscribe to News Subscribe to News