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Yard and Garden: Lawn Mowing Tips

April 30, 2014

AMES, Iowa — Proper mowing practices play a vital role in helping to maintain a healthy, sustainable home lawn. Horticulturists with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach answer questions about lawns and lawn mowing. Homeowners and gardeners with lawn questions should contact horticulturists at Hortline by emailing hortline@iastate.edu or calling 515-294-3108.

What is the proper mowing height for a lawn? 

Emerald Ash Borer Confirmed in Jasper County

March 28, 2014

DES MOINES – Emerald Ash Borer has been positively identified in a residential tree in Newton in Jasper County from a larva sample collected on March 20, 2014. EAB kills all ash tree species and is considered to be one of the most destructive tree pests ever seen in North America.
 

ISU Plant and Insect Diagnostic Clinic Identifies Mushrooms, Not Safety

May 15, 2014

morel mushroomThe Iowa State University Plant and Insect Diagnostic Clinic can help Iowans identify the mushrooms growing in their backyards and elsewhere, but cannot say whether they’re safe to eat. “We have been receiving numerous requests this spring to identify mushrooms and advise on edibility,” said Laura Jesse, director of the ISU Plant and Insect Diagnostic Clinic. “We are happy to assist in identification of fungi, but we don’t make recommendations about whether you should eat them. In addition, we often receive digital images where we cannot see key characteristics, making it impossible to identify a mushroom with certainty.”

Emerald Ash Borer Found in Johnson County

June 13, 2014

EAB, emerald ash borerDES MOINES – An adult Emerald Ash Borer submitted by an Iowa City resident to the Iowa EAB Team has been positively identified as the destructive beetle by a federal identifier. A follow-up examination of ash trees growing in the vicinity of where the beetle was collected has failed to confirm an infestation.

Japanese Beetles Emerge in Iowa

June 13, 2014

Japanese beetle is becoming a more common field crop pest in Iowa. Literature shows adults need about 1,030 growing degree days (base 50°F) to complete development. Japanese beetles will continue emergence until around 2,150 degree days. Based on accumulating degree day temperatures in 2014, Japanese beetle adults should be active in some areas of southeastern and southwestern Iowa this week (Fig. 1). Expect adults to emerge in central and northern Iowa in about 7-14 days if warm temperatures continue.

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