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Crop Scouting Competition for Iowa Youth 2017

Introduction to IPMThe Iowa State University Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Program is pleased to present the seventh annual Crop Scouting Competition for Iowa Youth. High school students (those completing grades 9-12) from Iowa are invited to compete and showcase crop scouting abilities in corn and soybean. The competition will be a one day event focusing on outdoor learning.

Crop Scouting Competition

Tuesday, August 5, 2014 - 8:00am to 2:30pm

High school students from across Iowa are invited to compete and showcase their scouting abilities in corn and soybean on August 5 at the Iowa State University Extension Farm. The competition will be a one day event with both indoor and outdoor components. The theme for this years competition is Crop Scouting Innovations. Monetary prizes will be awarded to winners. Click HERE for more information and registration.

EAB or Native Borer? New Publication Shows the Difference

July 1, 2014

AMES, Iowa — The Emerald Ash Borer is an insect that, in a matter of time, will destroy all ash trees. Because the bug has begun making its way across Iowa, an Iowa State University Extension and Outreach entomologist, in collaboration with an Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship entomologist, has written a new publication to help Iowans identify signs of the pest under the bark.

Periodical Cicada Flagging - The End is Near!

July 1, 2014

“All good things must come to an end” and that includes the cicada emergence of 2014.  Most of us will be sad to see them go, though many living in the midst of the emergence will be relieved that the cacophony of cicada singing will soon be over. 

Control of Foliar Diseases on Tomatoes

July 25, 2014

Septoria leaf spot and early blight are common foliar diseases of tomatoes in home gardens.  Fungal diseases overwinter on plant debris in the soil.  Fungal spores are splashed onto plant foliage by raindrops or splashing water and invade the plant tissue when leaf surfaces are wet.  Rainy weather in spring and early summer favors development of foliar diseases on tomatoes. 

 

Treatment for Prevention of Emerald Ash Borer

August 8, 2014

A recent inquiry from an Extension and Outreach colleague about timing of preventive treatments for the emerald ash borer (EAB) was insightful. This note is written to help direct types of treatments to the seasons they are most appropriate.
 
Insecticide product labels state that there are two windows for preventive treatments when applied to the soil or externally to the trunk of the tree: Spring and Fall.  Iowa State University Extension and Outreach publication PM2084 currently includes both windows, in keeping with the product labels.  Trunk injections can be done in a wider window (May through September 1) when the tree has a full crown and there is good soil moisture.

Turfgrass Rust

August 8, 2014

Rust is a fungal disease caused by several species of Puccinia.  All turfgrass species are susceptible to rust.  However, it is most commonly seen on perennial ryegrass and Kentucky bluegrass. 
 
From a distance, rust infected turf has a yellow-brown color.  Close examination of rust-infected grass blades reveals numerous yellow-orange pustules.  Rust can be easily diagnosed by walking across the lawn.  As one walks across the lawn, bright orange spores of the rust fungus rub off onto one’s shoes. 

Yard and Garden: Tackling Common Summer and Fall Tree Issues

August 7, 2014

Trees can become afflicted with problems that can change their appearance and overall health. Iowa State University Extension and Outreach horticulturists offer tips on fighting these issues. To have additional questions answered, contact the ISU Hortline at 515-294-3108 or hortline@iastate.edu.

My magnolia is infested with magnolia scale.  What are my control options?

Magnolia scale (Neolecanium cornuparvum) is the largest scale insect in Iowa. Adult magnolia scale females are pinkish orange to brown, elliptical and up to one-half inch in diameter. Females give birth to their young (known as nymphs or crawlers) in late summer.

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