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Effect of Tillage and Cultivar on Plant Population, Sudden Death Syndrome, and Yield of Soybean in Iowa

Sudden death syndrome (SDS) affects soybeans around the world and accounts for millions of tons of yield loss in the United States and Canada, ranking it as one of the top 10 yield-reducing diseases of soybean for 16 years. Managing SDS has been difficult with the lack of effective foliar fungicides and completely resistant cultivars, environmental influences and inconsistent management practices.

The researchers in the study aimed to determine the impact conservation tillage had in relation to SDS. Conservation tillage practices have become common practice to preserve soil moisture and prevent erosion, and has shown results in reducing soybean cyst nematode (SCN) populations in the field. Both SCN and SDS have a linked severity, but SDS also has a positive correlation with the soil moisture content.

The field experiments took place in Iowa in a field with a history of SDS and were evaluated for five consecutive years. Data showed there were differences in root rot severity and foliar disease symptoms across the years among different cultivars, but this was not due to tillage. Although yields were different across the years, researchers write that this was not due to tillage and can be explained by seeding rates and sufficient rainfall. The study confirms using resistant cultivars is the best practice to fight SDS, and that seed treatment, SCN management and diversification in cropping systems can aid in disease resistance. In all, incidences of SDS were not dependent on tillage method, as the incidence of disease was consistent throughout the study. SDS resistant cultivars would make the most impact.  

This study was published in 2019. To view the whole study, click here.

Project Type: 
Duration: 
03/04/2019
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Be on the Lookout for Brown Stem Rot in Soybean

August 12, 2014

Soybean diseases are starting to show up in Iowa fields this growing season. In an On-Farm Network trial in north central Iowa, brown stem rot (BSR) was recently found. This disease is caused by the fungus Phialophora gregata, and infection can result in yield loss for Iowa farmers.

Sampling for Soybean Cyst Nematode (SCN)

Ed Zaworski, of the Plant and Insect Diagnostic Clinic at Iowa State University, discusses sampling for soybean cyst nematode (SCN).  He gives tips and pointers on when and how to sample as well as how to properly ship your sample to the clinic for analysis.

 

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IPM YouTube

The Iowa State University Integrated Pest Management program is introducing a YouTube channel that promotes efforts of Iowa State scientists and researchers who provide means-tested crop and pest management solutions to stakeholders in Iowa and beyond. At the Integrated Pest Management Iowa State University channel, viewers will find content detailing the efforts and reaches of the IPM program, best practices and information, as well as demonstrations on how to properly identify and evaluate various insect and disease pests and their impacts on field crops.

Detecting soybean sudden death syndrome using remote sensing

Muhammad Mohsin Raza, a graduate research assistant at Iowa State University in the Plant Pathology and Microbiology department, discusses his research project in this video. Soybean sudden death syndrome is a disease of major economic importance in the North and South Americas regarding yield losses. Monitoring soybean health and detecting SDS at initial crop stages is essential to facilitate sustainable, environment-friendly, and cost-effective management practices in grower’s fields.

Sporecaster - Predicting white mold in soybean

Sporecaster is a new smartphone application designed to help farmers predict the need for a fungicide application to control white mold in soybean. The app, which is free to use, was developed with support from the Wisconsin Soybean Association and Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board. It was programmed by personnel in the UW-Madison Nutrient and Pest Management Program. In this video Iowa State University Plant Pathology graduate student Andrew Penney discusses using the Sporecaster app.

SCN resistance for long-term SCN Management

Monica Pennewitt, Iowa State University graduate student, discusses her research on soybean cyst nematode.The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) or Heterodera glycines is the most damaging pathogen to soybean production in North America. Current annual yield losses are estimated at more than $1.2 billion.Though SCN-resistant soybean varieties are available to minimize yield loss, producers are faced with limited options for rotation once virulent SCN populations develop in their fields.

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