Search results

Emerald ash borer confirmed in Montgomery Co, IA

August 18, 2015

DES MOINES – The emerald ash borer (EAB), a destructive and invasive insect of ash trees has been discovered in central rural Montgomery County. Iowa’s growing number of counties with confirmed detections has now reached twenty-seven. Native to Asia, EAB has spread to 25 states since first being identified in Michigan back in 2002. This exotic pest is responsible for the death of tens of millions of ash trees.  Click for current map of infestations.

 

Grasshoppers in the Home Garden

July 23, 2014

Grasshoppers are an occasional pest in Iowa farms and gardens.  The number of grasshoppers varies greatly from year to year and from place to place.  This appears to be one of the years when at least some growers and gardeners are going to see more than the usual number.

Periodical Cicadas: And Then They Were Gone

July 23, 2014

Sigh.  It's hard to believe but the periodical cicada emergence of 2014 that we waited 17 long years to see is over.  They came, they sang their song, they perpetuated the species (which is all that was expected on them, after all), and now they are gone.  Oh, there will be a few stragglers next summer to remind us of what was, but for the most part, those of us living in central Iowa will not see them here again until 2031.  Let the countdown begin!!

Control of Foliar Diseases on Tomatoes

July 25, 2014

Septoria leaf spot and early blight are common foliar diseases of tomatoes in home gardens.  Fungal diseases overwinter on plant debris in the soil.  Fungal spores are splashed onto plant foliage by raindrops or splashing water and invade the plant tissue when leaf surfaces are wet.  Rainy weather in spring and early summer favors development of foliar diseases on tomatoes. 


 

Treatment for Prevention of Emerald Ash Borer

August 8, 2014

A recent inquiry from an Extension and Outreach colleague about timing of preventive treatments for the emerald ash borer (EAB) was insightful. This note is written to help direct types of treatments to the seasons they are most appropriate.

 

Insecticide product labels state that there are two windows for preventive treatments when applied to the soil or externally to the trunk of the tree: Spring and Fall.  Iowa State University Extension and Outreach publication PM2084 currently includes both windows, in keeping with the product labels.  Trunk injections can be done in a wider window (May through September 1) when the tree has a full crown and there is good soil moisture.

Turfgrass Rust

August 8, 2014

Rust is a fungal disease caused by several species of Puccinia.  All turfgrass species are susceptible to rust.  However, it is most commonly seen on perennial ryegrass and Kentucky bluegrass. 

 

From a distance, rust infected turf has a yellow-brown color.  Close examination of rust-infected grass blades reveals numerous yellow-orange pustules.  Rust can be easily diagnosed by walking across the lawn.  As one walks across the lawn, bright orange spores of the rust fungus rub off onto one’s shoes. 

Emerald ash borer confirmed in Clinton County, IA

March 25, 2015

DES MOINES – Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been positively identified in the city of Clinton, making this the twentieth county in Iowa where this wood boring pest of ash trees has been found. EAB kills all ash tree species and is considered to be one of the most destructive tree pests ever seen in North America.

ISU Plant and Insect Diagnostic Clinic Identifies Mushrooms, Not Safety

May 15, 2014

morel mushroomThe Iowa State University Plant and Insect Diagnostic Clinic can help Iowans identify the mushrooms growing in their backyards and elsewhere, but cannot say whether they’re safe to eat. “We have been receiving numerous requests this spring to identify mushrooms and advise on edibility,” said Laura Jesse, director of the ISU Plant and Insect Diagnostic Clinic. “We are happy to assist in identification of fungi, but we don’t make recommendations about whether you should eat them. In addition, we often receive digital images where we cannot see key characteristics, making it impossible to identify a mushroom with certainty.”

EAB or Native Borer? New Publication Shows the Difference

July 1, 2014

AMES, Iowa — The Emerald Ash Borer is an insect that, in a matter of time, will destroy all ash trees. Because the bug has begun making its way across Iowa, an Iowa State University Extension and Outreach entomologist, in collaboration with an Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship entomologist, has written a new publication to help Iowans identify signs of the pest under the bark.

Pages